I use Pinterest to categorize a lot of my teaching resources. I’ve created a few boards that I will continue to add to as I go. If you have any resources you would like to add to my list or have links to other classical education Pinterest users, please let me know.
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Oaks Classical Christian School

I use Pinterest to categorize a lot of my teaching resources. I’ve created a few boards that I will continue to add to as I go. If you have any resources you would like to add to my list or have links to other classical education Pinterest users, please let me know.

My Boards

Classical Education on Pinterest

I teach Latin. I read classics. I indulge in letter writing. Even acquaintances predicted that I would have a, “vintage, Jane Austenish sort of wedding.” 
Along that vein, I’ve been told that I have an, “old soul.” I do not precisely know whether people mean that I’m mature or that I act like a crochety old lady. Either way, I prefer to interpret it as a compliment and mentally group myself with things like empire waistlines and the smell of old books. 
Chronological SnobberyBecause of this, I’m in danger of something called Chronological Snobbery. Chronological Snobbery is a logical fallacy in which something is deemed better or worse because of its time of origin.
For example: “Calvin’s Institutes is obviously a better systematic theology than Wayne Grudem’s because it was written during the Protestant Reformation.” While it is true that the Institutes was written during the Protestant Reformation, its time of origin has nothing to do with whether Calvin wrote a better systematic theology than Grudem. He may have. Or he may not have. But the time of his writing is irrelevant.
Old SchoolIn my context, it’s easy to do that with classical education. “We’re following the type of schooling that was developed by the ancient Greeks and Romans.” The inference here is that because classical education has existed for the past 2000+ years, it must be a better model than any of these newfangled, wishy-washy educational methods. Dewey be damned and all that.
While I love that what I teach has been taught for centuries and that, in learning from intellectual giants of the past, I’m able to think through thoughts first posed by Socrates and Augustine and Sir Isaac Newton, the traditionalism of classical education is not enough to validate it. Older is not always better. I don’t want to adopt Greco-Roman religion just because it’s older than Christianity.
After all, I have a savior who existed before time began. #intentionalirony
New GenerationHowever, snark aside, I do think that classical education, specifically classical Christian education, is the best teaching model available today. Classical Christian education seeks to discover truth, goodness, and beauty in God’s Word and world. I am challenged to train excellent students as a joyful celebration that God has endowed us with His Image. We don’t read classics to become haughty. We read them because, in doing so, we can enter into the Great Conversation and talk about questions related to the meaning of society, justice, beauty, truth, and sin. By doing this, students learn how to think for themselves.
Is that not what our society needs? The world is a very different place than it was one-hundred, fifty, or even ten years ago. We don’t know how it will change, and we can’t live expecting that life and society will stay just as they are. We need people to rise up who know how to think and how to articulate God’s immutable truth in the midst of a relativistic world. That’s what classical Christian education aims to do: not so that our students will save the world but so that they will point to Jesus as the One who will.

I teach Latin. I read classics. I indulge in letter writing. Even acquaintances predicted that I would have a, “vintage, Jane Austenish sort of wedding.” 

Along that vein, I’ve been told that I have an, “old soul.” I do not precisely know whether people mean that I’m mature or that I act like a crochety old lady. Either way, I prefer to interpret it as a compliment and mentally group myself with things like empire waistlines and the smell of old books. 

Chronological Snobbery
Because of this, I’m in danger of something called Chronological Snobbery. Chronological Snobbery is a logical fallacy in which something is deemed better or worse because of its time of origin.

For example: “Calvin’s Institutes is obviously a better systematic theology than Wayne Grudem’s because it was written during the Protestant Reformation.” While it is true that the Institutes was written during the Protestant Reformation, its time of origin has nothing to do with whether Calvin wrote a better systematic theology than Grudem. He may have. Or he may not have. But the time of his writing is irrelevant.

Old School
In my context, it’s easy to do that with classical education. “We’re following the type of schooling that was developed by the ancient Greeks and Romans.” The inference here is that because classical education has existed for the past 2000+ years, it must be a better model than any of these newfangled, wishy-washy educational methods. Dewey be damned and all that.

While I love that what I teach has been taught for centuries and that, in learning from intellectual giants of the past, I’m able to think through thoughts first posed by Socrates and Augustine and Sir Isaac Newton, the traditionalism of classical education is not enough to validate it. Older is not always better. I don’t want to adopt Greco-Roman religion just because it’s older than Christianity.

After all, I have a savior who existed before time began. #intentionalirony

New Generation
However, snark aside, I do think that classical education, specifically classical Christian education, is the best teaching model available today. Classical Christian education seeks to discover truth, goodness, and beauty in God’s Word and world. I am challenged to train excellent students as a joyful celebration that God has endowed us with His Image. We don’t read classics to become haughty. We read them because, in doing so, we can enter into the Great Conversation and talk about questions related to the meaning of society, justice, beauty, truth, and sin. By doing this, students learn how to think for themselves.

Is that not what our society needs? The world is a very different place than it was one-hundred, fifty, or even ten years ago. We don’t know how it will change, and we can’t live expecting that life and society will stay just as they are. We need people to rise up who know how to think and how to articulate God’s immutable truth in the midst of a relativistic world. That’s what classical Christian education aims to do: not so that our students will save the world but so that they will point to Jesus as the One who will.

Latin Links is a game played each quarter by my middle school Latin classes. Each grade competes against the other to find the most Latin references outside of Latin class. Past links have been found in songs, movies, books, television shows, etc. The class with the most Latin Links at the end of the quarter gets an in-class party. The top student in each grade also receives a prize. 
To submit a link, a student must include: (1) his/her name, (2) his/her grade, (3) the Latin Link, (4) its English translation, and (5) its source.

Example: “E pluribus unum” means “Out of many, one.” It is found on the Great Seal of the United States. —Marcus, 6th grade

Latin Links is a game played each quarter by my middle school Latin classes. Each grade competes against the other to find the most Latin references outside of Latin class. Past links have been found in songs, movies, books, television shows, etc. The class with the most Latin Links at the end of the quarter gets an in-class party. The top student in each grade also receives a prize. 

To submit a link, a student must include: (1) his/her name, (2) his/her grade, (3) the Latin Link, (4) its English translation, and (5) its source.

Example: “E pluribus unum” means “Out of many, one.” It is found on the Great Seal of the United States. —Marcus, 6th grade

Today marks one year since I finished student teaching. At that time, I was happy to be done, ready to graduate, and uncertain that I’d be able to handle the responsibilities of a full-time teacher. I wondered to an extent whether I’d deluded myself into thinking that God wanted me to be a teacher in the first place. But, what other job could my degree get me?

For the most part, this was nonsense. My grades and supervisor feedback were good. I’d already gone to an interview at a school in my area, and they were going to have me come in and teach a demonstration lesson. But, even so, I was plagued with insecurity and doubt.

Fortunately, that school—which eventually hired me—was not terribly interested in how I was feeling about teaching at the moment. Rather, they believed more in what they saw God doing in me than in what I thought about myself. And since being at my school, I’ve learned to trust more in His work among broken people than a ‘fake it till you make it’ attitude which promotes insincerity rather than integrity.

I work at a school that accepts my mess and rejoices in God’s work in my life. Convinced that I’d be found out as an imposter, my heart was put at ease the first day of faculty orientation when the headmaster told us, “You are all here because, in one way or another, you have expressed a desire to be sanctified.”

In that, I strive to be a better teacher than I was last week, last month, last year. But it’s a pursuit driven by joy rather than desperation. I am in a place where it is safe to try and fail and try again. Where I have incredibly supportive administration and colleagues and parents and students.

I think of myself as a “next year teacher” because I want to grow into the teacher that Christ wants me to be. Rather than allowing myself to be consumed with my failures, I look ahead and expect His good work in my heart. Even if I don’t grow in heart and mind and spirit as instantaneously as I sometimes desire, I have the hope that He who began a good work in me will perfect it until the day of Jesus Christ (cf. Philippians 1:6).

However, this in no way means that I’m ready to ditch this first year. I’m excited for this summer as a time to transition and rejuvenate and prepare for September. But I love where God has me right now. I’m glad to figure out how to deal with restless children who sense the finish line approaching. I will miss their boisterous greetings and sweet smiles. I may even come to miss handing out missing work slips each Friday (hopefully not!).

In Christ, I can be grateful for my past, my present, and my future. I know that even if I don’t know what I’m doing or where I’m going, He certainly does.

Today marks one year since I finished student teaching. At that time, I was happy to be done, ready to graduate, and uncertain that I’d be able to handle the responsibilities of a full-time teacher. I wondered to an extent whether I’d deluded myself into thinking that God wanted me to be a teacher in the first place. But, what other job could my degree get me?

For the most part, this was nonsense. My grades and supervisor feedback were good. I’d already gone to an interview at a school in my area, and they were going to have me come in and teach a demonstration lesson. But, even so, I was plagued with insecurity and doubt.

Fortunately, that school—which eventually hired me—was not terribly interested in how I was feeling about teaching at the moment. Rather, they believed more in what they saw God doing in me than in what I thought about myself. And since being at my school, I’ve learned to trust more in His work among broken people than a ‘fake it till you make it’ attitude which promotes insincerity rather than integrity.

I work at a school that accepts my mess and rejoices in God’s work in my life. Convinced that I’d be found out as an imposter, my heart was put at ease the first day of faculty orientation when the headmaster told us, “You are all here because, in one way or another, you have expressed a desire to be sanctified.”

In that, I strive to be a better teacher than I was last week, last month, last year. But it’s a pursuit driven by joy rather than desperation. I am in a place where it is safe to try and fail and try again. Where I have incredibly supportive administration and colleagues and parents and students.

I think of myself as a “next year teacher” because I want to grow into the teacher that Christ wants me to be. Rather than allowing myself to be consumed with my failures, I look ahead and expect His good work in my heart. Even if I don’t grow in heart and mind and spirit as instantaneously as I sometimes desire, I have the hope that He who began a good work in me will perfect it until the day of Jesus Christ (cf. Philippians 1:6).

However, this in no way means that I’m ready to ditch this first year. I’m excited for this summer as a time to transition and rejuvenate and prepare for September. But I love where God has me right now. I’m glad to figure out how to deal with restless children who sense the finish line approaching. I will miss their boisterous greetings and sweet smiles. I may even come to miss handing out missing work slips each Friday (hopefully not!).

In Christ, I can be grateful for my past, my present, and my future. I know that even if I don’t know what I’m doing or where I’m going, He certainly does.